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Do you have an editor you love working with, whose work and attitude stand out?

Why not nominate them for the best editor award in the ABSW Science Writers' Awards for Great Britain and Ireland?

The award carries a £1,000 prize and will be judged on the quality of editing demonstrated through a submitted statement of achievement in the award entry year, which can include links to supporting articles or broadcasts. The award is for editing in STEM subjects. 

Find our more here: https://www.absw.org.uk/absw-awards/guidelines.html

 

 

Have you tried a different approach to science storytelling? Experimented with new reporting tools or media platforms? Or perhaps used an existing technique or technology in a new and unexpected way to improve science journalism?

If so, you are probably eligible for a new ABSW award for the best innovation the field of science journalism. The award is open for entries until 31 January. Find out more and enter here: https://www.absw.org.uk/absw-awards/guidelines

The award will be for innovative approaches in the gathering, presentation and/or delivery of STEM journalism. The award will be made to the individual or team considered to have made the most innovative approach in the entry year. The success/impact of the approach will be considered although this will only form part of the judging criteria. The nature of the award means that entry can be flexible with statements of achievement considered alongside evidence or examples of work. The judges will be looking for out-of-the box thinking, and new, unusual and disruptive approaches to journalism.  

Journalists reporting for local and regional media in any format anywhere in the UK or Ireland are now eligible for a £1,000 prize from the Association of British Science Writers.

The ABSW realises that local and regional press are facing difficult times, and has launched the new award to reward excellence and independence in reporting on local or regional issues in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

The award is open for entries until 31 January. Enter here: https://www.absw.org.uk/absw-awards/guidelines

The award will recognise the work of a journalist covering STEM subjects in a local or regional outlet. This could be news or features, in print, online or broadcast media but the item must clearly be aimed at a local or regional audience. Submissions are limited to one per person. 

Do you know a senior science journalist who deserves to be recognized for outstanding work over decades of work?

Consider nominating them for ABSW Lifetime Achievement Award, which is made to an individual nearing the end of their career, or who is retired (the Award may also be made posthumously).

The Award celebrates the work of a journalist or writer whose career reflects lifetime achievement in promoting excellence and creativity in science journalism/science writing.

The recipient is recognised for entertaining and informing audiences, and/or for inspiring new generations of journalists and writers, and/or for making a lasting impact in their main area of expertise. 

Previous winners include: Steve Connor (The Independent), Andy Coghlan (New Scientist), Deborah Cohen (BBC Radio), Dick Ahlstrom (The Irish Times), David Dickson (SciDev.Net), Fred Pearce (freelancer), Geoff Watts (freelancer), Dr John Gribbin (author and freelancer), Sir David Attenborough (BBC Television), Tim Radford (The Guardian).

This Award is not made by self-entry but by nomination of an individual to the ABSW Executive. Nominations are requested from ABSW members and should include a statement outlining why the individual meets the criteria above.

The ABSW Executive Board receives nominations and makes a final decision on who should receive the Award.  

To make your nomination please email the relevant details to the ABSW Executive Board via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

“Frankenfoods could kill you”, “MMR linked to autism” and “mobile phones will fry your brain”. This is but a small sample of science based health stories that broke across the national news media in the late 90’s / early 00’s. With hindsight, such stories may have been based upon questionable scientific evidence.


In 2000, a House of Lords science and technology committee concluded that there was a need to improve the communication of science, risk and uncertainty across all spheres of public life. Several recommendations of this report sought to improve the manner in which “science” communicated with journalists – such as the establishment of institutions such as the Science Media Centre to act as a liaison between the world of science and the world of journalism. Other recommendations were aimed towards modulating how journalists constructed their science based news stories in that efforts should be made to mitigate uncertainty and develop a “responsible” approach risk within news stories. 

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